Sunday, June 18, 2017

CBS Sunday Morning on Fathers Day, June 18, 2017 does Monterey Pop and Custer's Last Stand

Jane Pauley introduced the stories for June 18, 2017, beginning with Ted Koppel's cover story on the increasing divide in American politics. Second mentioned was Anthony Mason on the 50th anniversary of Monterey Pop. Tony DeCappo on millenial dads, Mo Rocca on Custer's Las Stand, Seth Doane, Steve Hartman on the need to behave like a little leaguer, and DeMarco Morgan.

The news headlines were the USS Fitzgerald at Yokosuba, fires in Portugal, and the London fire. There was an image noting summer begins Wednesday, June 21, at 12:24 A.M. EDT.

Prior to the cover story, there were pieces by DeMarco Morgan on Cosby and Erin Moriarty on Michelle Carter (manslaughter because of texting).

The June 18 cover story ("The Great Divide") is related to a prior piece by Koppel, not mentioned by CBS on June 18. Within the prior March 2017 Koppel story ("The Great Divide") was text:

A Pew study finds 81% of voters say they cannot agree with the other side on basic facts, which may owe something to the president’s campaign against “fake news.”

CNN’s Jim Acosta: “Just because of the attack of fake news and attacking our network, I just want to ask you, sir …
President Trump: “I’m changing it from ‘fake news,’ though. ‘Very fake news.’”

There’s nothing new about simmering hostility between a President and the press.

There was a text from Fareed Zakaria [once accused of plagiarism; see 2012 Washington Post--Fareed Zakaria suspended by CNN, Time for plagiarism]: “I think the President is somewhat indifferent to things that are true or false. He has spent his whole life bullsh***ing. He has succeeded by bullsh***ng.”

Within the June 18, 2017 piece, Koppel spent some time with Yochai Benkler, who was referred to as an "honest academician." For clarity, Benkler is a Harvard Law grad (1994) and is a faculty co-director of the Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society at Harvard. Whether law grads are academicians is open to question. Of relevance to intellectual property, Benkler in "Wealth of Networks" raises the possibility that a culture in which information is shared freely could prove more economically efficient than one in which innovation is encumbered by patent or copyright law. In the June 18 piece, it seemed that Benkler was saying that there was a uniformity in factual presentation by news groups (other than say by Breitbart). Pat Buchanan suggested that the great divide started with the November 1968 speech by Nixon on the silent majority and media followup thereto. Similarities between Buchanan's presidential run in 1992 and Trump's campaign were mentioned.

The Almanac piece was the creation of New Jersey's "Steel Pier" on June 19, 1898, which was attended by, among others, Annie Oakley. Yes, pictures of diving horses, and a 1938 color clip of The Three Stooges.

Next up, Daddy's home, featuring Millenial (born after 1980) fathers. A clip of a 1966 Lyndon Johnson establishing Fathers Day. Mention of the MGH "Fatherhood Project."

Seth Doane interviewed Lang Lang. Of note was a reference to classic music being the province only of professors (compare honest academicians)

Steve Hartman on the post (baseball) game handshake and how we should act more like little leaguers.

Anthony Mason on the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival, organized by John Phillips and Lou Adler. Top ticket: $6.50. Members of the governing group suggested musicians to appear. Michelle Phillips suggested Otis Redding. Paul McCartney suggested Jimi Hendrix. Competition between The Who and Hendrix. Eric Burdon there in 1967 and will be there in 2017.

The piece on Custer's Last Stand by Mo Rocca was poorly done. Presumably of news note because the "battle" was on June 25, 1876. There was mention of Custer's being "last in his class." There were two West Point Classes of 1861, one in May and one in June. Custer was indeed number 34 of 34 in June 1861. Number 1 in the class was Patrick H. O’Rorke, who was killed at Gettysburg. Number 11 was Alonzo Cushing, also killed at Gettysburg, and awarded the Medal of Honor. Number 33 (just ahead of Custer) was Frank A. Reynolds, who served in the Confederate Army. The Rocca piece mentioned economic troubles for Custer in 1876 but omitted his political troubles. Custer had to beg to be part of the expedition.
Also omitted was Custer's attack on an Indian encampment comprising mainly women and children, which provoked Custer's problems. Although there was reference to Custer's body being mutilated, Custer's was the only body of the command not scalped. No mention was made of Custer's brothers also killed at Big Horn, including the one awarded two Medals of Honor. LBE has previously noted an irony in Custer's work at East Cavalry Field (where his men were armed with repeating (Spencer) rifles) and at Little Big Horn (where only the Indians had repeating rifles)

Moment of nature: wild burros in Black Mountains of Arizona.

***Separately, from Blawgsearch on 18 June 2017


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